Abstract Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine gender differences in food habits and food choices, including decisions in healthy eating, to personalize diet therapies to be as effective possible for long-term weight loss. Design/methodology/approach In this cross-sectional study, eating behaviours were assessed using a questionnaire composed of 12 questions concerning food habits, 17 concerning food taste, and four about healthy eating. There were 2,021 (1,276 women) Caucasian adults enrolled in the study. Findings Statistically significant differences in women compared to men occurred for the following questionnaire entries reading eating habits: whole grain food (10.0 per cent higher in women; p < 0.001); cereals such as barley (8.3 per cent higher in women, p < 0.001); cooked vegetables (6.6 per cent higher in women, p < 0.001); eggs (5.0 per cent lower in women, p = 0.03); meat (9.3 per cent lower in women, p < 0.001); and processed meat (7.1 per cent lower in women, p < 0.001). Women consume more water, sugar-sweetened beverages and alcoholic drinks than males, and liked salty foods more than sweet foods. Men ate faster, ate more during the night and slept worse than women. Men ate meals out more often and tended to be hungrier later in the day. Women missed more meals and ate more times during the day and were also more likely to eat uncontrollably. Research limitations/implications The authors observed strong evidence of profound gender-specific differences between men and women in terms of dietary habits, the taste of food and in the relationship with meals. Practical implications The findings suggest a need for the creation of gender-specific programs for promoting a healthy lifestyle. Social implications A need for the creation of gender-related programs for promoting healthy lifestyle has been demonstrated. Originality/value Reasons for the different eating behaviours among men and women have been found. Western society’s perception of the ideal body weight is much lower for women than for men. In general, social perceptions influence nutritional behaviour to a great extent. Women’s greater nutritional knowledge and sex-specific taste preferences also account for the differences in eating behaviour.

Gender differences in taste and foods habits

LOMBARDO, MAURO
;
PADUA, ELVIRA;Massimiliano Caprio;
2019-01-01

Abstract

Abstract Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine gender differences in food habits and food choices, including decisions in healthy eating, to personalize diet therapies to be as effective possible for long-term weight loss. Design/methodology/approach In this cross-sectional study, eating behaviours were assessed using a questionnaire composed of 12 questions concerning food habits, 17 concerning food taste, and four about healthy eating. There were 2,021 (1,276 women) Caucasian adults enrolled in the study. Findings Statistically significant differences in women compared to men occurred for the following questionnaire entries reading eating habits: whole grain food (10.0 per cent higher in women; p < 0.001); cereals such as barley (8.3 per cent higher in women, p < 0.001); cooked vegetables (6.6 per cent higher in women, p < 0.001); eggs (5.0 per cent lower in women, p = 0.03); meat (9.3 per cent lower in women, p < 0.001); and processed meat (7.1 per cent lower in women, p < 0.001). Women consume more water, sugar-sweetened beverages and alcoholic drinks than males, and liked salty foods more than sweet foods. Men ate faster, ate more during the night and slept worse than women. Men ate meals out more often and tended to be hungrier later in the day. Women missed more meals and ate more times during the day and were also more likely to eat uncontrollably. Research limitations/implications The authors observed strong evidence of profound gender-specific differences between men and women in terms of dietary habits, the taste of food and in the relationship with meals. Practical implications The findings suggest a need for the creation of gender-specific programs for promoting a healthy lifestyle. Social implications A need for the creation of gender-related programs for promoting healthy lifestyle has been demonstrated. Originality/value Reasons for the different eating behaviours among men and women have been found. Western society’s perception of the ideal body weight is much lower for women than for men. In general, social perceptions influence nutritional behaviour to a great extent. Women’s greater nutritional knowledge and sex-specific taste preferences also account for the differences in eating behaviour.
2019
Diet, Weight loss, Mediterranean diet, Eating habits, Gender differences, Healthy eating behaviour
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12078/3741
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