BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Few studies have investigated the long-term variation of nutritional parameters after bariatric surgery. We examined changes in weight, vitamin status and patient-reported dietary supplements use up to 5 years after surgery. SUBJECTS/METHODS: Circulating vitamin levels and data on self-reported dietary supplements use were collected in patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and adjustable gastric banding (AGB). These parameters were re-assessed 3 and 5 years after surgery. RESULTS:Sixty subjects (48 women, mean age = 41.6 years ± 11.3 years) completed the 5-year follow-ups after surgery (AGB n = 8; SG n = 36; RYGB n = 16). No early post-surgery complications were reported. Average weight loss after 60 months was 29.7 ± 12.4 kg and excess body weight loss was 40.6 ± 20.4 kg. Percentage excess weight loss was 63.1 ± 26.1% (AGB 40.4 ± 31%; SG 61.7 ± 22.3%; RYGB 77.6 ± 22.6%). At 5 years, nutritional deficiencies were reported in 28%, 70% and 87% of AGB, SG and RYGB patients, respectively. Dietary supplements use was infrequent before surgery, whereas it was reported by 61% and 73% of patients at 3 and 5 years after surgery (AGB 37%; SG 75%; RYGB 94%). CONCLUSIONS:Despite the widespread recommendation to use multivitamin supplements, nutritional deficiencies cannot be ruled out, even after 5 years of follow-up post-bariatric surgery. As a result, continuous intermittent surveillance of nutritional parameters is suggested in post-bariatric surgery patients. KEYWORDS: Obesity; Bariatric surgery; Nutritional deficiencies; Long-term follow-up; Roux-en-Y gastric bypass; Sleeve gastrectomy; Gastric banding; Dietary supplements use.

Potential nutritional deficiencies in obese subjects five years after bariatric surgery

Mauro Lombardo;Elvira Padua;
2019

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Few studies have investigated the long-term variation of nutritional parameters after bariatric surgery. We examined changes in weight, vitamin status and patient-reported dietary supplements use up to 5 years after surgery. SUBJECTS/METHODS: Circulating vitamin levels and data on self-reported dietary supplements use were collected in patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and adjustable gastric banding (AGB). These parameters were re-assessed 3 and 5 years after surgery. RESULTS:Sixty subjects (48 women, mean age = 41.6 years ± 11.3 years) completed the 5-year follow-ups after surgery (AGB n = 8; SG n = 36; RYGB n = 16). No early post-surgery complications were reported. Average weight loss after 60 months was 29.7 ± 12.4 kg and excess body weight loss was 40.6 ± 20.4 kg. Percentage excess weight loss was 63.1 ± 26.1% (AGB 40.4 ± 31%; SG 61.7 ± 22.3%; RYGB 77.6 ± 22.6%). At 5 years, nutritional deficiencies were reported in 28%, 70% and 87% of AGB, SG and RYGB patients, respectively. Dietary supplements use was infrequent before surgery, whereas it was reported by 61% and 73% of patients at 3 and 5 years after surgery (AGB 37%; SG 75%; RYGB 94%). CONCLUSIONS:Despite the widespread recommendation to use multivitamin supplements, nutritional deficiencies cannot be ruled out, even after 5 years of follow-up post-bariatric surgery. As a result, continuous intermittent surveillance of nutritional parameters is suggested in post-bariatric surgery patients. KEYWORDS: Obesity; Bariatric surgery; Nutritional deficiencies; Long-term follow-up; Roux-en-Y gastric bypass; Sleeve gastrectomy; Gastric banding; Dietary supplements use.
nutrition; bariatric; follow-up
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12078/2776
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