Four- to 6-repetition maximum and 1-repetition maximum estimation in free-weight bench press and smith machine squat based on body mass in male athletes. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2024-This study aimed to explore the feasibility and face validity of predicting maximum strength 1 repetition maximum (1-RM) and 4-6 RM in athletes across different sports specialties, based on the relationship between muscle strength and BM. One hundred fifteen male athletes, aged 23.63 ± 6.77 years and participating in diverse sports specialties, were included in this study. Muscle strength was assessed using the 4-6 RM and 1-RM tests in free-weight bench press (BP) and Smith machine squat (SQ) exercises, whereas BM was measured using a portable digital scale. A linear regression equation based on muscle strength and BM was performed. The 4-6 RM and 1-RM scores showed excellent intersession relative reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient(2,1): 0.946-0.989) and absolute reliability (CV: 3.4-4.7%) in both BP and SQ exercises. In addition, the magnitude of the relationship and the coefficients used to estimate the 4-6 RM and 1RM, based on BM, differed among the subjects when they are grouped according to their sports specialties (R2 ranged from non-significant to 0.998). Overall, the 4-6 RM test showed a stronger correlation with BM (R: 0.655 for SQ and R: 0.683 for BP) than the 1RM (R: 0.552 for SQ and R: 0.629 for BP), and the general (i.e., not sport-specific) 4 to 6-RM prediction equations should be preferred over sport-specific ones because they are statistically more robust due to the larger sample size. In conclusion, the 4-6 RM can be predicted from BM with high reliability, a moderate association, and a prediction error that, when considering the 4-6 RM as a starting point for estimating of the 1RM, can be considered entirely acceptable in practical settings.

4–6 Repetition Maximum (RM) and 1-RM Prediction in Free-Weight Bench Press and Smith Machine Squat Based on Body Mass in Male Athletes

Migliaccio, Gian Mario
2024-01-01

Abstract

Four- to 6-repetition maximum and 1-repetition maximum estimation in free-weight bench press and smith machine squat based on body mass in male athletes. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2024-This study aimed to explore the feasibility and face validity of predicting maximum strength 1 repetition maximum (1-RM) and 4-6 RM in athletes across different sports specialties, based on the relationship between muscle strength and BM. One hundred fifteen male athletes, aged 23.63 ± 6.77 years and participating in diverse sports specialties, were included in this study. Muscle strength was assessed using the 4-6 RM and 1-RM tests in free-weight bench press (BP) and Smith machine squat (SQ) exercises, whereas BM was measured using a portable digital scale. A linear regression equation based on muscle strength and BM was performed. The 4-6 RM and 1-RM scores showed excellent intersession relative reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient(2,1): 0.946-0.989) and absolute reliability (CV: 3.4-4.7%) in both BP and SQ exercises. In addition, the magnitude of the relationship and the coefficients used to estimate the 4-6 RM and 1RM, based on BM, differed among the subjects when they are grouped according to their sports specialties (R2 ranged from non-significant to 0.998). Overall, the 4-6 RM test showed a stronger correlation with BM (R: 0.655 for SQ and R: 0.683 for BP) than the 1RM (R: 0.552 for SQ and R: 0.629 for BP), and the general (i.e., not sport-specific) 4 to 6-RM prediction equations should be preferred over sport-specific ones because they are statistically more robust due to the larger sample size. In conclusion, the 4-6 RM can be predicted from BM with high reliability, a moderate association, and a prediction error that, when considering the 4-6 RM as a starting point for estimating of the 1RM, can be considered entirely acceptable in practical settings.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12078/21486
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