In the last decade a growing body of epidemiological and clinical data has emerged to support the concept that longstanding inflammation potentiates or promotes tumor development, growth and progression. Among pro-inflammatory gene products involved in such interactions are tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6 and vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs), whose expression is mainly regulated by the transcription nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B. Clinically, several reports have detected abnormally high levels of circulating cytokines in cancer patients, and inflammation is currently being investigated as a target of anticancer therapies. To date three main groups of antiangiogenic drugs approved for clinical use and experimentation can be identified: secreted VEGF inhibitors, tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibitors (mainly VEGFR inhibitors) and drugs that inhibit angiogenesis with a complex mechanism. More recently, TNF-alpha antagonists have become available. The first clinical data on anti-TNF-alpha showed that this drug can be used in cancer patients without major side-effects. Further investigations are needed to understand if anti-TNF-alpha or NF-kappa B inhibitors may really represent a novel approach in cancer treatment, probably as adjuvant to other therapies, such as anti-angiogenic or cytotoxic agents.

TNF/VEGF cross-talk in chronic inflammation-related cancer initiation and progression: An early target in anticancer therapeutic strategy

Guadagni F;Ferroni P;
2007-01-01

Abstract

In the last decade a growing body of epidemiological and clinical data has emerged to support the concept that longstanding inflammation potentiates or promotes tumor development, growth and progression. Among pro-inflammatory gene products involved in such interactions are tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6 and vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs), whose expression is mainly regulated by the transcription nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B. Clinically, several reports have detected abnormally high levels of circulating cytokines in cancer patients, and inflammation is currently being investigated as a target of anticancer therapies. To date three main groups of antiangiogenic drugs approved for clinical use and experimentation can be identified: secreted VEGF inhibitors, tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibitors (mainly VEGFR inhibitors) and drugs that inhibit angiogenesis with a complex mechanism. More recently, TNF-alpha antagonists have become available. The first clinical data on anti-TNF-alpha showed that this drug can be used in cancer patients without major side-effects. Further investigations are needed to understand if anti-TNF-alpha or NF-kappa B inhibitors may really represent a novel approach in cancer treatment, probably as adjuvant to other therapies, such as anti-angiogenic or cytotoxic agents.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12078/1795
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 70
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 71
social impact