Background: Balance and mobility deficits are most prevalent impairments in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The evidence has proposed that rehabilitation plays an important role in improving balance and mobility post-TBI. Virtual reality (VR) is a computer technology that provides immersed users to generate feedback such as visual, audio, and haptic. Objective: This review aimed to examine the effects of the VR treatment intervention on balance and mobility in patients with TBI and to define the most effective VR treatment protocol. Methods: SCOPUS, PEDro, PubMed, REHABDATA, EMBASE, and the web of science were searched for experimental trials examining the impacts of VR training on balance and mobility in patients with TBI from inception until July 2022. Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale was used to assess the methodological quality of the selected studies. Results: Five randomized controlled trials (RCTs) met the inclusion criteria. The PEDro scores ranged from 6 to 8, with a median of 6. A total of 157 patients with TBI were included in this review, 31.2% of whom were females. The findings showed that VR intervention is not superior to traditional physiotherapy interventions in improving balance and mobility post- TBI. Conclusions: The preliminary findings showed that the influence of VR on the balance and mobility ability in patients with TBI is promising. Combining VR with other concurrent rehabilitation interventions may show more significant improvements in balance and mobility compared to VR interventions alone. The optimal VR treatment protocol remains unclear. Further randomized controlled trials are strongly needed.

Virtual reality for balance and mobility rehabilitation following traumatic brain injury: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials

Padua, Elvira
;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Background: Balance and mobility deficits are most prevalent impairments in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The evidence has proposed that rehabilitation plays an important role in improving balance and mobility post-TBI. Virtual reality (VR) is a computer technology that provides immersed users to generate feedback such as visual, audio, and haptic. Objective: This review aimed to examine the effects of the VR treatment intervention on balance and mobility in patients with TBI and to define the most effective VR treatment protocol. Methods: SCOPUS, PEDro, PubMed, REHABDATA, EMBASE, and the web of science were searched for experimental trials examining the impacts of VR training on balance and mobility in patients with TBI from inception until July 2022. Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale was used to assess the methodological quality of the selected studies. Results: Five randomized controlled trials (RCTs) met the inclusion criteria. The PEDro scores ranged from 6 to 8, with a median of 6. A total of 157 patients with TBI were included in this review, 31.2% of whom were females. The findings showed that VR intervention is not superior to traditional physiotherapy interventions in improving balance and mobility post- TBI. Conclusions: The preliminary findings showed that the influence of VR on the balance and mobility ability in patients with TBI is promising. Combining VR with other concurrent rehabilitation interventions may show more significant improvements in balance and mobility compared to VR interventions alone. The optimal VR treatment protocol remains unclear. Further randomized controlled trials are strongly needed.
2022
Balance
Mobility
Rehabilitation
Traumatic brain injury
Virtual reality
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12078/12286
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